Tag: trump

Trump makes more bizarre tech claims

Desperate to appear in control again after losing a crucial anti-Obama care vote, Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump has claimed that he was personally involved in a move by Charter Communications’ decision to invest $25 billion in the United States and hire 20,000 workers over four years.

At a White House event with the second largest US cable company’s Chief Executive Thomas Rutledge and Texas Governor Greg Abbott, Trump praised Charter for planning to close its offshore call centres and move them to the United States.

Trump said: “We’re embracing a new economic model – the American Model. We’re going to massively eliminate job-killing regulations – that has started already, big league – reduce government burdens, and lower taxes that are crushing American businesses and American workers.”

But the decision is not new. Charter said last May that it planned to add 20,000 jobs as part of its merger with Time Warner Cable and acquisition of Bright House Networks. As early as June 2015, Rutledge said Charter would need an additional 20,000 employees after those deals.

The company said more than a year ago in February 2016 that it planned to close foreign Time Warner Cable call centres and move the jobs to the United States.

This is not the first time that Trump has touted job announcements at the White House that had been previously planned or announced.

“You’re going to see thousands and thousands and thousands of jobs, of companies, and everything coming back into our country.”

FBI is investigating Russian gaming of the US election

 

The FBI is investigating how Russia used an internet army to bombard America with right-wing news and fake stories when candidate Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump was on the defensive during the 2016 election.

The Untouchables are concerned that some of those news outlets might have worked to help Russian operatives.

Led by the FBI’s Counterintelligence Division, the investigation is examining how stories from sites like Breitbart News, InfoWars, and the Kremlin-backed RT News and Sputnik News, were spread across the internet.

The investigation, the sources said, is examining whether certain far-right sites took any action to aid Tsar Putin.

In early January 2017, America’s intelligence agencies concluded Russia had mounted a disinformation campaign to influence the US election and picked out RT’s American division as one of the culprits.

FBI Director James Comey told a House Intelligence Committee hearing on the issue that Russia’s efforts were targeted to “hurt our democracy” and specifically “hurt” Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and “help” current President Donald Trump.

Of course, he did a little bit of that himself during the election and managed to keep his job after Trump took office.

Investigators are now looking at millions of Twitter and Facebook posts carrying links to real stories, and others that mixed fact and fiction, on conservative websites sent out by social media bots. These computer programmes, of “bots,” were operated by Russia on multiple social media accounts and were programmed and coordinated to spread and amplify messages across the internet.

Russia apparently used these social media accounts to bombard the internet with pro-Trump stories at times during the campaign when he was on the defensive against Clinton.

Russian bots and paid trolls used the timed release of information “to propagate stories underground and these stories appear to have been amplified by fringe elements of our media like Breitbart.

The investigation into the bots is just one branch of several investigations being run by the FBI probing Russia’s attempts to influence the 2016 election. Others are working to identify those behind the hacks and publication of the Democratic National Committee’s emails, leading Republicans, and Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager John Podesta.

Others are pursuing leads from informants and foreign communications intercepts about the Trump campaign’s contacts with Russian intelligence officers before the November election.

This is the first time that Comey has revealed officially that the FBI is investigating the Trump campaign.

Meanwhile Alex Jones of the conspiracy theory website InfoWars has claimed that the whole thing is a witch hunt by the left. “I’m not gonna sit here and say, ‘I’m not a Russian stooge,’ because it’s a ******* lie,” said on his talk show.

US government insists Muslim airlines ban electronics

Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump has decided that people flying on Muslim airlines should not be allowed to use electronic equipment.

Apparently the world is full of terrorists who play games on their notebooks before taking over the aircraft and flying into buildings.

Royal Jordanian airlines banned the use of electronics on flights servicing the US after government officials here expressed concerns.  CNN is reporting that 12 other carriers based on the Middle East and Africa may be affected as well.

Royal Jordanian told its passengers that the ban includes laptops, tablets, and video games, but does not include smartphones or medical devices.

A spokesperson for DHS had only this to say: “We have no comment on potential security precautions, but will provide any update as appropriate.”

A Saudi executive also tweeted that “directives by US authorities” could affect passengers traveling from 13 countries, with the new measure set to go into effect over the next 96 hours.

In January, the Trump administration created chaos at the nation’s airports when it issued a travel ban directed at seven Muslim-majority nations. A federal court blocked the ban, leading the president to issue a second, more watered-down version of the ban. That executive order has also been blocked.

The ban does not block mobile phones so terrorists can still play games, read their instructions from their handlers and remotely set off the bomb in the luggage bay.

 

TSMC mulls US chip plant

TSMC fab in Hsinchu - Wikimedia CommonsTSMC has said that it will decide next year on building a US chip plant to get the Trump government off its back.

TSMC chairman Morris Chang had said the company did not rule out the idea of building a US foundry, however it now is clear the company is waiting until next year to see what happens.

The company said that there would be a loss of some benefits if it moved to the States. If an earthquake happened for instance in Taiwan, it could send thousands of people there as support, while it is harder in the States.

Local media CNA news agency reported on Monday that TSMC would make a decision on the plant in the first half of 2018.

The report also said TSMC was considering a $16.41 billion investment for the plant.

But the company could also be distracted by another more pressing matter of investing in Toshiba’s chip business. An industry source familiar with the matter said TSMC was deeply interested in the Toshiba unit.

Trump slashes US science funding

The US government has cut funding to science as part of its cunning plan to return to a nice biblical view of things.

Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump has decided that there is far too much science which assumes really weird things, like the earth is older than six thousand years, and that everything is going to be wiped out by a giant flood. All of this is impossible according to the Bible, so he does not see why the US is funding it.

Instead Trump’s first budget plan wants to invest piles of cash in the military. The plan, released on 16 March, calls for double-digit cuts for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Institutes of Health. It also lays the foundation for a broad shift in the United States’ research priorities, including a retreat from environmental and climate programmes.

Boffins are worried that the Trump administration’s stance will jeopardise US leadership in fields ranging from climate science to cancer biology. The US has only started to recover from President George Bush’s veto on the use of stem cells which were made for similar reasons. But these cuts are more sweeping.

Jason Rao, director of international affairs at the American Society for Microbiology in Washington DC. The greatest threats to the United States, he says, are those presented by infectious diseases, climate change, and energy production — which cannot be addressed effectively without scientific research.

The Trump budget will cut funding for the NIH by 18 percent , to $25.9 billion, making it one of the hardest-hit research agencies. The document also calls for a reorganisation of the NIH’s 27 institutes — including the elimination of the smallest, the Fogarty International Centre — but offers no further detail beyond a pledge to “rebalance Federal contributions to research funding”.

It appears that the move is based on a paranoia in the Bush camp that the NIH is overstepping its powers.

On the plus side Trump would also create a fund within the Department of Health and Human Services, the NIH’s parent, to respond to public health emergencies such as the spread of the Zika virus.

Scientists and public health experts have called for such a fund for years, but advocates say that starting one while cutting research and prevention programmes is pointless. It is cheaper to prevent a crisis than mop one up afterwards.

But the Environmental Protection Agency is going to lose a third of its $8.2-billion budget and 3,200 its 15,000 staff. The EPA’s Office of Research and Development would see its funding reduced by half, from $483 million to $250 million.

All this is because Trump does not believe in climate and environmental regulations. One biologist, who studies chemicals that affect the endocrine system in fish and potentially people, is part of a programme that Trump wants to eliminate. She said that the reason is that if there’s no science to point out potential problems, there won’t be any more regulations.

The White House wants to cut 5.6 percent, or $1.7 billion, from the Department of Energy (DOE). The plan would eliminate the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy, which funds ‘high-risk, high-reward’ research. And it would slash $900 million, or about 20 percent, from the DOE’s Office of Science, which supports research on topics such as high-energy physics, energy, climate change and biology.

The Trump plan does not include an overall funding target for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). But it would eliminate the agency’s long-running, $73-million Sea Grant programme, which supports 33 US colleges and universities that conduct research, education and training about ocean and coastal topics.

Still this is good news for the rest of the world as it will mean that while the US is dumbing down, it can take control of scientific developments without much in the way of competition. The UK did rather well when George Bush dropped the ball on stem cell research so it is likely that European research will do well.

What should be more worrying for Trump is that his moves will give more power to the Chinese and Russian governments who will also have time to catch up.

Trump insists that Obama was listening through his microwave

 

Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump is standing by his bizarre claim that former president Barrack Obama was listening into his election conversations through his microwave.

While every other member of the US Senate Intelligence Committee rejected Trump’s bizarre claim that the Obama administration wire-tapped him during the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump is sticking to his guns, or rather his nukes.

The top Republican in Congress, House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan, added his voice to a growing chorus of lawmakers saying there was no sign of a wiretap.

But White House spokesman Sean Spicer forcefully defended the president, citing news reports of intelligence collection on possible contacts between Trump associates and Russia in the presidential campaign.

“There is no question that there were surveillance techniques used throughout this,” Spicer said.

The Republican president has accused his predecessor, Democrat Barack Obama, of wiretapping him near the end of the campaign. An Obama spokesman said that was “simply false”.

“Based on the information available to us, we see no indications that Trump Tower was the subject of surveillance by any element of the United States government either before or after Election Day 2016,” Richard Burr, the Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, and Senator Mark Warner, the committee’s Democratic vice chairman, said in a statement.

Ryan also said there was no evidence of surveillance.

“The point is, the intelligence committees in their continuing, widening, ongoing investigation of all things Russia, got to the bottom – at least so far – with respect to our intelligence community that – that no such wiretap existed,” the House speaker told reporters.

Pressed at the White House briefing on whether Trump would back down from his wiretap accusations, Spicer said: “He stands by it”.

Spicer also chastised the media for focusing so much attention on comments disparaging Trump’s claim about surveillance. He said reporters had not focused enough on comments from officials denying evidence of any collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.

But that might have been because the news is really about Trump’s allegations that his associates had ties to Russian officials and the White House wants that buried. Trump fired his national security adviser, Michael Flynn, last month after he failed to disclose contacts with Russia’s ambassador before Trump took office on January 20.

An official familiar with the investigations by Congress and intelligence and law enforcement agencies said investigators had looked as aggressively and thoroughly as they could for evidence of any spying on Trump or his associates but had found none.

At least four congressional committees included the startling accusation in their investigations of possible Russian meddling in the election campaign and Russian ties to Trump and his associates.

Apple tries to appease Trump with some strange numbers

The fruity tax-dodging cargo-cult Apple has told the world that it spent roughly $50 billion last year using US-based suppliers.

The move is an attempt to suggest to the US president Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump that Apple does not really make all its gear in foreign parts.  Apple has previously not mentioned this figure before.

Speaking at an annual shareholder meeting, Cook gave the previously undisclosed data at a time when Apple has come under pressure from President Donald Trump for building its iPhones in China.

“We’re always looking for more ways to help our country. We know that Apple can only exist in the US,” Cook told shareholders.

Cook named 3M and Corning as US companies which Apple buys its stuff from.  But the figures look rather strange and fly in the face of similar announcements a few years ago. In 2013 Apple said it spent Apple Spent Over $3 billion with 7,000 US business suppliers.  That announcement was touted as proof that Jobs Mob was building out its US supply chain.

Named by Cook were US companies 3M and Corning Glass.  The figure sounds quite high but given that an iPhone costs $200 to make and Apple sold 290 million of them in 2016 that means that the total cost was $58 billion. So Cook expects the world to believe that most of Apple’s manufacturing dollar was spent in the US?  Even if Cook’s figure does not just cover the iPhone, it strikes us a trifle high.

The good side about announcing a figure like that is that no one can check it.

 

FBI running three probes into Russian gaming of the US elections

The Untouchables have three separate probes into the Russian hacking of the US presidential elections.

For those who came in late, it is widely believed Tsar Vladimir Putin ordered his crack team of hackers to game the US presidential election to put a wealthy orange businessmen who owes him and his Russian chums rather a lot of cash in the top job.

Donald (Prince of Orange) and Tsar Putin have denied it, but then it is likely they would. Trumpets who support Donald Trump have been appearing all over the internet saying that “there is no proof” despite rather a lot of evidence that this sort of thing was going on.

The FBI’s Pittsburgh field office, which runs many cyber security investigations, is trying to identify the people behind breaches of the Democratic National Committee’s computer systems, the officials said.

Those breaches, in 2015 and the first half of 2016, exposed the internal communications of party officials as the Democratic nominating convention got underway and helped undermine support for Hillary Clinton.

The Pittsburgh case has progressed furthest, but Justice Department officials in Washington believe there is not enough clear evidence yet for an indictment, two of the sources said.

The bureau’s San Francisco office is trying to identify the people who called themselves “Guccifer 2” and posted emails stolen from Clinton campaign manager John Podesta’s account, the sources said.

Those emails contained details about fundraising by the Clinton Foundation and other topics.

Beyond the two FBI field offices, FBI counterintelligence agents based in Washington are pursuing leads from informants and foreign communications intercepts, two of the people said.

This counterintelligence inquiry includes but is not limited to examination of financial transactions by Russian individuals and companies who are believed to have links to Trump associates. The transactions under scrutiny involve investments by Russians in overseas entities that appear to have been undertaken through middlemen and front companies, two people briefed on the probe said.

Scott Smith, the FBI’s new assistant director for cybercrime, declined to comment this week on which FBI offices were doing what or how far they had progressed. It is hard to see him being enthusiastic to find a culprit as he might find himself having arrest the bloke who appointed him,

A White House spokesman pointed to a comment Trump made during the campaign, in which he said: “As far as hacking, I think it was Russia, but I think we also get hacked by other countries and other people.”

Trump claims he has no business connections to Russia and that reports in the New York Times that Americans with ties to Trump or his campaign had repeated contacts with current and former Russian intelligence officers before the November election were fake news.

EU watchdogs want privacy assurances from Trump

European Union data privacy watchdogs are demanding that a move by US President Donald (Prince of Orange) Trump to crack down on illegal immigration will not undermine a transatlantic pact protecting the privacy of Europeans’ data.

Trump wrote an executive order on January 25 aiming to toughen enforcement of US immigration law. It ordered US agencies to “exclude persons who are not United States citizens or lawful permanent residents from the protections of the Privacy Act regarding personally identifiable information.”

This basically killed off any agreement that the EU had on safe harbour data transfers. It means that if there is a US company running a cloud operation in the EU it has to turn over any data on anyone.

The EU’s data protection authorities said they would write to U.S. authorities “pointing out concerns and asking for clarifications on the possible impact of the Executive Order” on that framework, known as the Privacy Shield, as well as on another agreement protecting law enforcement data shared between the United States and the EU.

The EU-US Privacy Shield is used by almost 2,000 companies including Google, Facebook and Microsoft to store data about EU citizens on US servers and makes possible about $260 billion of trade in digital services.

It replaced a previous system thrown out by the top EU court on the grounds it allowed US spies unfettered access to data stored on US servers.

The European Commission press office has played down concerns over any threat to the privacy of Europeans’ data, saying the US Privacy Act had never protected Europeans’ data and so any changes to it would not affect EU-US data transfer agreements.

But it might be that the European court might see things differently.

Zuckerburg talks bulwarks about isolationism

Facebook's Zuckerberg - Wikimedia CommonsSocial notworking Tsar Mark Zuckerberg was speaking a load of bulwarks against rising isolationism.

In a note, he wrote to Facebook users and claimed that the social notworking site could be the “social infrastructure” for the globe and a bulwark against isolationism.

“Across the world there are people left behind by globalization, and movements for withdrawing from global connection,” Zuckerberg wrote.

The question, the 32-year-old executive said, was whether “the path ahead is to connect more or reverse course,” adding that he stands for bringing people together.

Zuckerberg quoted Abraham Lincoln, the US president during the country’s 19th century Civil War and waxed rather philosophical saying that the dogmas of the quiet past, were inadequate to the stormy present.

Facebook could move far beyond its roots as a network for friends and families to communicate, suggesting that it can play a role in five areas, all of which he referred to as “communities,” ranging from strengthening traditional institutions, to providing help during and after crises, to boosting civic engagement.

In comments on Facebook, some users praised Zuckerberg’s note for staying positive, while others declared “globalism” dead.

Facebook has been under pressure to monitor closely police hoaxes, fake news and other controversial content, although the concerns have had little impact on its finances. The company reported 2016 revenue of $27.6 billion, up 54 percent from a year earlier.

One area where Zuckerberg wrote that Facebook would do better would be suggesting “meaningful communities.” Some 100 million users are members of groups that are “very meaningful” to them, he wrote, representing only about five percent of users.

Facebook is also using artificial intelligence more to flag photos and videos that need human review, Zuckerberg wrote.

While there is much that can be agreed with in Zuckerberg manifesto he did avoid one word which would have been nice to hear “privacy.”