Tag: Steve Ballmer

Ballmer slates iPad

Steve Ballmer, CEO of Microsoft, has slated the iPad, saying it is uncomfortable, lacking in features, and that seeing one of them on the market is more than he would like.

In an interview with CNet after the Windows Phone 7 event, Ballmer spilled the beans on just what he really thought of that other Steve’s favourite toy.

He suggested that the iPad is awkward and that someone who wants to sit and do an interview and take notes with it will find it quite uncomfortable. 

He slammed it for its lack of keyboard, which is actually where the iPad succeeded by eliminating the need for a keyboard through a strong touch-based user interface. 

He also said he didn’t like that the screen wasn’t big and that it doesn’t stand up on its own.

When asked about the pervasive iPad, Ballmer could not hide his discontent at its success: “You certainly see more,” he said. “You certainly see more than I would like. One is more than I would like.”

For all the negativity he threw Apple’s way he was reluctant to comment on how Microsoft would do any better. When asked about Windows tablets he was particularly evasive, saying that tomorrow should be left for tomorrow and when there’s some news to reveal he will talk about it.

So, in other words, Microsoft will focus on Windows Phone 7 for now, giving Apple and Google another head start on tablets, just as it did in the smartphone market.

Ballmer recognised that when Microsoft finally enters the tablet game it will face some stiff competition. “Certainly we have our work cut out for us,” he said.

He also took a jab at the iPhone 4 and its notorious signal dropping by suggesting that Windows Phone 7 handsets would not have that kind of problem: “I make phone calls, not surprisingly, a lot of them and I don’t want those phone calls dropped.” We reported today HTC is trying to rush a fix for the broken Windows Phone proximity sensor on the HD7.

Ballmer described himself as “a mobile person”, despite criticism from the Board of Directors that he was not moving fast enough in the mobile sector, resulting in the latest instalment of the Windows Phone series becoming a late player in the phone war.

Ballmer mulls buying Adobe

The dark satanic rumour mill has manufactured a hell on earth yarn which claims that Microsoft is thinking of buying Adobe.

The word on the street is that “boss of the year” and serial chair chucker Steve “sounds of silence” Ballmer has been wining and dining Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen.

You can take the information with a grain of salt because the rumour comes from the Apple press office, or New York Times as it is sometimes called. According to the Times, Ballmer and Adobe are so terrified by the might of Steve Jobs that they are considering uniting to deal with him.

The Times said a meeting, which lasted “more than an hour” dealt with Apple and its control of the mobile phone market and how the two companies could team up in the battle against Cupertino.

On the table was the acquisition of Adobe by Microsoft.

Adobe and Microsoft are rivals with competing software. This is particularly true since 2007 when Microsoft began promoting Silverlight, its software plug-in which is a rival to Adobe Flash.

But the New York Times claimed that the pair were scared of the block that Steve Jobs had placed on Adobe’s Flash software for its hand-held devices. Strangely, although the block has been well publicised by the US press who drink Apple’s Kool Aid, it is widely seen as being a total farce. Apple’s lack of Flash has been a sales opportunity for Android.

Buy out talks between Microsoft and Adobe happened a few years ago. But Microsoft backed out fearing that the DoJ would get it on anti-trust grounds. But things have changed with Google and Apple becoming more important players. These days such a deal would not be stopped.

While it does make sense for Microsoft to buy Adobe, it is less likely to be because of Apple. Adobe sits on some very good technology which works well with Redmond’s Office software. Its web systems are more popular than Silverlight will ever be. It would be good for Adobe software because Redmond would spend a large amount of resources making the technology more secure, better and more likely to survive in the future. 

Meet the tech fashion brat-pack

The fashion elite always has a look that defines them over their peers. Anna Wintour has her statement sunglasses, Georgio Armani makes his stand with his trademark navy t-shirts and Claudia Schiffer has her knee high boots.

However it’s time for the original fashion crowd to stand back and make way for a new wave of style icons who are worming their way into the style stakes through their classy choice of checked suits, polo shirts and jeans. 

Jobs

Steve Jobs, Steve Ballmer and Larry Ellison are just some of the high profile fashionistas on the tech scene.

Just one look at Steve Jobs’ classic 501s make us women drawl and turn men green with style envy. And Mr Jobs knows how to wear that denim, opting for mid rinse, light and occasionally indigo. He’s also got the distressed look just right. They don’t look new and don’t look old, they’re buttoned (never belted) above the hip but below the waist – it takes a man who knows his fashion to pull this off. Copy Jobs’ jeans with these from Asos.

While many men team up their jeans with a plain and predictable t-shirt, Steve shuns the obvious look, spicing up his denims with classy black turtlenecks – you can find one similar from Marks and Spencers – and those must-have New Balance trainers are available from Amazon.

Ballmer

Mr Jobs isn’t the only icon on the block. Although he may not have the business acumen of his Apple rival, Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer is just as successful when it comes to style.

The Microsoft CEO looks best when he’s dressed casually in his trademark polo shirts, which he alternates in colour and style. Stripes, pinks, yellows and blues stretch nicely over his middle age paunch and compliment those classy chinos. If it’s cold we may also get a glimpse of one of those stylish knitted v-necks – most definitely cashmere – he wears to keep warm. To get a more affordable version visit French Connection.

However, he goes one step further when it comes to dressing up – take note Jobs, he’s slowly overtaking you in the fashion wars – opting for smart, often tweed, suits, pale blue shirts and bright ties to make his style stand.

Hurd

Mark I did not sleep with that woman Hurd may have faced flak for his antics, but we dare anyone to point the finger at his style, because this man really has it all from that stylish mummy’s boy parting to those crisp suits, get the look at Suits You.

It’s no wonder HP wanted to get rid of him, after all anyone would be jealous of this man’s biz chic style especially when it comes to his range of striped, spotted and bright silk ties, we just hope Ellison doesn’t feel threatened although we’re sure the two fashion boys can play nicely. They do, after all, have very different looks.

Ellison

If suits are your fashion fetish then you’ll know that the man to look to is Larry Ellison.

Tweed, checked, grey and black, tailored or loose, Oracle’s main man has his eye on the setting strong trends and forward thinking fashion future. Like any icon he mixes up his traditional look, shunning those shirts and sticking a stylish t-shirt underneath that jacket. If you want to look as good as Ellison visit Asos again.

Similarly to Jobs he’s also partial to a turtle neck jumper, but he’d never be caught pairing it up with a pair of jeans, it’s not his thing. What makes Ellison really stand out amongst his peers of course that rugged beard, which always looks trimmed to perfection and ranges in colours from brown to ginger to white. It suits this Autumn’s on-trend Lumberjack look nicely.

Gates

If it’s specs that rock your fashion boat then look now further than Bill Gates. Forget his sleek suits, blue shirts, serious ties, chinos and v-necks because when it comes to spex appeal this man has it all. His statement square glasses with thin lenses stand out amongst the tech crowd framing his gracefully ageing face and showing off that stylish crop hairstyle. You know Specsavers is the best place to go to get the look here.

Paul

However, Gates can’t get too complacent with his specs because one man that’s after his crown is Intel’s Paul S. Otellini. He may not wear them all the time, but when he does, those rounded specs really give him an edge over his competitors, add to that his subtle checked shirts – get yours from TM Lewin – worn in a risque open button style with no tie and he’s a definite contender for the next style king.

There you have it! Get buying.

* EyeNote: Andrea Petrou is a fashion journalist.

Motorola and Microsoft are still friends, honest

Despite the fact that Microsoft is suing him into a coma, the head of Motorola mobile-phone business said he wants to developing devices that run Microsoft new Windows Mobile 7 operating system.

Motorola co-Chief Executive Sanjay Jha is being sued as Microsoft tries to work out a way of doing some damage to Android, which Motorola uses on its smartphones.

But Jha told the Wall Street Journal  that he is willing to look at using Microsoft’s operating system if the software company gets it right.

He said that he was open to finding ways to work with Microsoft. But it has to be a compelling offering.

Motorola engineers haven’t seen the system, but Jha said that from what he had heard, it was a “rational offering”.

Android has been Motorola’s savour. The outfit was sliding down the tubes until it adopted Android and had a series of hit phones. Motorola aims to return its mobile-phone operations to profitability by Christmas.

Redmond claims that Motorola’s Android-based phones violate nine Microsoft patents covering the synchronization of email, calendars and contacts, scheduling of meetings, and notifying applications of changes in signal strength and battery power.

Jha said some of these lawsuits are part of business and while he could do without them life is not always like that.

Jha said when he took over Motorola’s cellphone business in 2008, he wanted to work with Microsoft’s mobile software as well as Google’s Android. He said the first call he received as co-CEO was from Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer.

Redmond stuffed it all up by failing to bring out a new operating system in 2009. This meant that he had no choice but to exclusively support Android. If Motorola had not delivered a smartphone in 2009 it would have gone under, he said. 

Tech CEOs act like rock stars at GMSA

We know that being the CEO of a tech corporation carries a lot of stress and strain – going around in limousines,flying First Class or in their executive jets with big comfy chairs and collecting 10s and 10s of million a year and those other things they have to deal with.

But when they’re guest speakers at GMSA do they really have to act like top models or wrinkly rock stars and throw their weight around?

A mole tells me that Steve Ballmer, CEO of Microsoft, got into a right old strop at GMSA because everything wasn’t really to his taste.

Mr Ballmer requires a special “Ballmer’s Pack” which includes a very specific kind of peanut butter, it seems. His GMSA pack didn’t have that peanut butter in so a band of staffers were sent round Barcelona to try and hunt down the brand.

He refuses to eat any brand.  It also appears he got a little shouty and upset some of the Asian guests. Strange, he’s not called Steve “whispering” Ballmer for nothing.

Another top CEO called GMSA staff very early in the morning to make sure that the chair he had on stage swivelled.

It all reminds us a little of a Carly Fiorina staffer when she was at HP, who insisted that Carly “was more important than the King of Spain”.

How the other half live….

Manufacturers don't want Microsoft's tablet

The dark satanic rumour mill has manufactured a hell on earth yarn that manufacturers are not interested in Microsoft CEO’s Steve Ballmer’s new vision for a tablet.

After going out unto the desert for 40 days and 40 nights, and feasting entirely on locusts, Ballmer came back with a vision of an Intel Atom-based tablets running Microsoft’s Windows operating system in an iPad.

However manufacturers think that Steve might have skimped on the locusts and dined on mushrooms instead.

Chatting off the record to Ubergizmo  in the style of Digitimes, the manufacturers say that after the iPad they are working out how to make a tablet that lasts longer with better battery efficiency.

They are mostly interestedin ARM-based and Android.  But hang on aren’t these manufacturers also showing off tablet offerings running Intel’s revised Atom CPU, called Oak Trail, at the Intel Developer Forum in September?

Apparently that is because they feel  pressured into releasing Intel and Windows tablets to maintain and preserve their relationships with the two tech giants.

One very thirsty manufacturer said that vendors will  launch Atom-and-Windows-based models in small volumes to maintain their relationships with Intel and Microsoft, and also to gauge market demand.

Apparently they fear that if they do not appease the two giants Intel will not give them access to more popular chips, like the Core i7.  So they fear more the wrath of Intel and not that of Steve and his Microsoft machine.

Actually everyone is only guessing that Oak Trail models that will be shown at the Intel Developer Forum next month will be production samples or if they will ever make it to consumer’s hands.

Oak Trail, unlike previous Atom-based chips, promises 50 per cent  more power efficiency when playing full high definition videos and can support the MeeGo, Windows, and Android operating systems.

Intel claims it is seeing more adoption: from the industry adoption for the Atom platform optimized for tablets and sleeker netbook form factors.

 

 

Manufacturers don’t want Microsoft’s tablet

But are two scared to admit it to Intel

 

The dark satanic rumour mill has manufactured a hell on earth yarn that manufacturers are not interested in Microsoft CEO’s Steve Ballmer’s new vision for a tablet.

After going out unto the desert for 40 days and 40 nights, and feasting entirely on locusts, Ballmer came back with a vision of an Intel Atom-based tablets running Microsoft’s Windows operating system in an iPad.

However manufacturers think that Steve might have skimped on the locusts and dined on mushrooms instead.

Chatting off the record to Ubergizmo http://www.ubergizmo.com/15/archives/2010/08/manufacturers_reluctant_to_make_intel_windows_tablets.html in the style of Digitimes, the manufactures say that after the iPad they are working out how to make a tablet that lasts longer with better battery efficiency.

They are mostly interestedin ARM-based and Android. But hang on aren’t these manufacturers also showing off tablet offerings running Intel’s revised Atom CPU, called Oak Trail, at the Intel Developer Forum in September?

Apparently that is because they feel pressured into releasing Intel and Windows tablets to maintain and preserve their relationships with the two tech giants.

One very thirsty manufacturer said that vendors will launch Atom-and-Windows-based models in small volumes to maintain their relationships with Intel and Microsoft, and also to gauge market demand.

Apparently they fear that if they do not appease the two giants Intel will not give them access to more popular chips, like the Core i7. So they fear more the wrath of Intel and not that of Steve and his Microsoft machine.

Actually everyone is only guess that Oak Trail models that will be shown at the Intel Developer Forum next month will be production samples or if they will ever make it to consumer’s hands.

Oak Trail, unlike previous Atom-based chips, promises 50 per cent more power efficiency when playing full high definition videos and can support the MeeGo, Windows, and Android operating systems.

Intel claims it is seeing more adoption: from the industry adoption for the Atom platform optimized for tablets and sleeker netbook form factors.

 

HP won't make a Microsoft Windows 7 phone

For the last week or so there had been some doubt whether or not the maker of jolly expensive printer ink HP would make a phone using Microsoft’s Mobile 7 OS.

Although HP had no need to sign up for Steve Ballmer’s mobile dream once it had bought Palm’s webOS, there was talk that HP might still use Windows 7 in the short term.  There were dark mutterings that the WebOS would not be ready for HP’s needs straight away.

Now the official word is that Windows 7 on HP smartphones is deader than Rameses III, may he rise for ever in Amenti, and less likely to be seen on the street than Osama bin Laden wearing a ” Jesus is my Lord” teeshirt.

HP executive vice president Todd Bradley has confirmed that the webOS mobile operating system, is where it is at and it is not interested in developing stuff with Windows 7 Mobile inside it.   Well apparently it is thinking about a two-platform strategy for its Slate tablets with enterprise customers get the Windows versions, and the general consumer market gets webOS.

But Bradley said that Microsoft is out for HP’s smartphones.

However,  Microsoft will not be too upset.  After all Asus, Dell, and Samsung have all signed on as Windows Phone 7 partners. It will still be involved in the HP slate, which does look good too. 

 

No Windows 7 Phone from HP

It is officially dead

 

For the last week or so there had been some doubt whether or not the maker of jolly expensive printer ink HP would make a phone using Microsoft’s Mobile 7 OS.

Although HP had no need to sign up for Steve Ballmer’s mobile dream once it had bought Palm’s webOS, there was talk that HP might still use Windows 7 in the short term. There were dark mutterings that the WebOS would not be ready for HP’s needs straight away.

Now the official word is that Windows 7 on HP smartphones is deader than Rameses III, may he rise for ever in Amenti, and less likely to be seen on the street than Osama bin Laden wearing an “I love George Bush teeshirt”.

HP executive vice president Todd Bradley has confirmed http://www.electronista.com/articles/10/07/24/hp.drops.microsoft.for.all.future.smartphones/ that the webOS mobile operating system, is where it is at and it is not interested in developing stuff with Windows 7 Mobile inside it. Well apparently it is thinking about a two-platform strategy for its Slate tablets with enterprise customers get the Windows versions, and the general consumer market gets webOS.

But Bradley said that Microsoft is out on HP’s smartphones.

However Microsoft will not be too upset. Afterall Asus, Dell, and Samsung have all signed on as Windows Phone 7 partners.

Microsoft continues to rack up corporate coins

Redmond turned in remarkable results for its fourth quarter, underlining the fact that practically the whole world and its dog revolve around the rather manky but long lasting Windows operating system.

The firm said that it scored revenues of $16.04 billion for its quarter and turned in net profits of $4.52 billion, which isn’t a bad margin, at all.

The revenues were up 22 percent compared to the same quarter last year but its net profits rose by 48 percent on the back of Windows sales.

Corporations are starting to buy Windows 7 big time, demonstrating that whether there’s an iCore 3, 7, 9 or 11 from Intel, or a strontium-germanium chip underlying it, we all depend on Windows, like it or like it not. Even Intel, although we suspect Intel fabs still use DEC’s VMS.

Kevin Turner, Microsoft’s chief operating officer (COO like a pigeon), said it saw strong sales  across all of its products. He underplayed Windows Phone 7 however, and didn’t mention the trashing of its ‘Kin phone.

But with profits and margins like this – who cares?

He did say Windows 7 and Office 2010 did well, reflecting an upturn in sales to corporations and enterprises.

Microsoft is not Google and Turner didn’t mention Bing! either. Who cares about Apple, Microsoft seemed to be implying. The company has corporate nuts in the palm of its hands, now large corporations realise they’ve actually got to upgrade, like it or not.  Microsoft’s real enemy – and it’s been its enemy for the last 20 years is IBM – not the FTC, the Justice Department nor the European Union.

Intel is its temporary friend.

Microsoft to pay for Windows 7 Mobile development

Software giant Microsoft is taking no chances that Windows 7 Mobile will fail due to a lack of developer support.

It seems that Redmond has been watching the Apple OSX and Android development communities and been thinking “We will have some of that!”

The problem is that both those communities were set up over time with developers who were either committed to making their guru Jobs rich, or a belief in Open Saucy operating systems. 

Microsoft has the problem that no one considers Steve Ballmer a heart throb, other than Mrs Ballmer, and Microsoft is about as closed as a Chinese prison for political opponents.

Microsoft has decided that the way forward is to buy the hearts and minds of developers. The cunning plan is not new to Microsoft,  it opened its cheque book to get people to use Bing, but the outfit has not previously co-funded development projects.

Redmond told InfoWorld that the plan is a “new developer opportunity”.

“We have a long history of engaging with developers to offer support in the creation of compelling apps. The limited use of co-funding to help initiate strategic projects is not new to Microsoft; furthermore, developers tell us that we do not engage in any co-funding activity outside the scope of our competitors,” the company said.

Word on the street is that interest in Windows 7 Mobile developer kits is lukewarm, and Microsoft needs to heat it up a bit before the release.