Tag: navy

US Navy all at sea about cloud

bostin The US Navy has changed course on its cloud strategy before it gets a public broadside.

Apparently the navy has not made as much progress on data centre consolidation and moving to the cloud as it wants to and will change tactics later this year.

John Zangardi, the Navy’s deputy assistant secretary for command, control, computers, intelligence, information operations and space and acting chief information officer said that Data Centre control will have to move to better align consolidation efforts with network efforts and more fully use the Next Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN) contract.

He said that the Navy realised that it had to shift from a mistaken belief that all its data had to be near instead of somewhere in the cloud.

He said that this was a big shift for many within the department. It’s not going to be an easy transition.”

Since 2012, the Navy has made some progress. Zangardi, said over the last three years, the Navy has consolidated 290 systems and apps across 45 sites. But overall, he said getting bases and commands to move faster just isn’t happening.

Zangardi picked three data centres that are lagging behind and required them to develop a plan to consolidate and move their data to a centralised data centre.

The Navy is rationalising its large scale apps. Zangardi said too often people hold their applications and servers close.

He told Federal News  that  while the Navy is open to using commercial or public clouds. .

 

Iranian hackers damaged the US navy

Iranian hackers managed to score a more serious hit on the US Navy than has been previously admitted.

In September, the US Navy’s largest unclassified computer network was hacked by a group either “working directly for Iran’s government or acting with the approval of Iranian leaders”.

Not much was said at the time, but it looked like a simple hack in revenge for all that Stuxnet stuff that the US and Israel did to the Iranian nuclear plant.

Now US officials say that the network infiltration was far more extensive than previously thought, and lasted much longer.

According to The Wall Street Journal, it took the Navy four months after initial news of the hack was published in late September to purge the hackers from the network.

The hackers hit the Navy Marine Corps intranet through “a security gap” in one of the Navy’s public-facing websites. Officials say that the hackers made no headway into classified networks but seemed to be everywhere in the network.

It took a coordinated plan to push them out and cyberwarriors and contractors had to be bought in to do the job. The cost to repair the network, a senior defence official said, was $10 million and will probably rise when a few invoices are paid.

The US Navy was surprised at the skills of the Iranian hackers. They had previously relied on DDoS attacks to attack US government networks which are not that difficult to stop.

What is worrying is that while the hackers reportedly were not able to extract any truly valuable information from their infiltration, they could still do a lot of damage. Moreover, the Iranians could train many people in their techniques. 

Obama names naval top spook

US President Barack Obama has named US Navy officer, Vice Admiral Michael Rogers to spy on everyone in his glorious empire.

Rogers, by name and Rogers by profession will take over as head of the National Security Agency.

The department is under unprecedented pressure after leaks from ex-intelligence contractor Edward Snowden showed that it was carrying out electronic surveillance on an unprecedented scale.

Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel, who recommended Rogers for the post, said that Vice Admiral Rogers would bring extraordinary and unique qualifications to this position as the agency continues its vital mission and implements President Obama’s reforms.

Rogers would also take over as head of the military’s cyber warfare command.

It is a moot point how sympathetic Rogers would be to any reforms of the NSA. He started out life as an intelligence cryptologist and heads the US Fleet Cyber Command, overseeing the navy’s cyber warfare specialists. For the last 30-year he has has worked in cryptology and eavesdropping, or “signals intelligence”.

It is not clear then how he will respond when he is face to face with civil liberties and privacy questions under an intense public spotlight.

Hagel said he was “confident that Admiral Rogers has the wisdom to help balance the demands of security, privacy and liberty in our digital age”,

The president rejected calls to name a civilian as NSA director. However, the new NSA deputy director would be Richard Leggett, making him the agency’s senior ranking civilian, acting as a chief operating officer.

Leggett has managed the NSA’s media leaks task force, which evaluated the effect of Snowden’s disclosures.

In December Leggett said he would be open to “having a conversation” with Snowden about a possible amnesty in return for a full accounting of what the ex-contractor took and where the files are now. We somehow do not think that will happen. 

US Navy wants to stick weapons on universal remote control

The US Navy has and enough of having shedloads of remote controls to run all its weapons and wants to develop a universal remote so it does not have to keep looking down the back of the sofa every time it wants to unleash a particular type of missile.

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has developed something similar to a master remote control for military ground, air and undersea unmanned systems that will work across the services,

Apparently it is a piece of software which uses a Common Control System, which is comprised of many different common control services.

Dubbed the Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Control Segment (UCS) the software can be added to any unmanned system to enable it to communicate and work with any other.

It will run on any type of platform or hardware, and it can overlay existing systems running on propriety software to make them work with any others.

Basically it means that a soldier can control an entire unmanned system, from the vehicle itself to its payload.

Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder said that in the future you will have a sailor controlling an Air Force unit’s unmanned system, or an airman sitting at a desk controlling a naval unmanned system or a Marine controlling an Army platform.  

The code does mean that the days of unmanned systems being developed and fielded as individual items built by different vendors are over. This system has led to increased spending, from $284 million in 2002 to more than $3 billion in fiscal year 2010.

It means that all are uniquely controlled by proprietary software created by numerous vendors, and the data they provide is sent out in unique formats, making it very difficult to control various systems with one master control or sift through all of the information being transmitted.

Having a common controller will change this and allow systems to work with one another. It will also get rid of custom-built components and systems will simplify the systems themselves, as well as purchasing and training processes, thereby reducing costs.

According to Navy magazine all of the data captured by the systems will be saved on the cloud which will be transparent across the military and easily accessible to and quickly navigable by all service members.

US Navy warships vulnerable to cyber attack

A Navy team of computer hacking experts found deficiencies when assigned to try to penetrate the network of the USS Freedom, the lead vessel in the $37 billion Littoral Combat Ship programme.

According to Reutersthe navy insists that the problems were not severe enough to prevent an eight-month deployment to Singapore. So far the USS Freedom has seen action on the “war on drugs” and so far the drugs barons have not thought of trying to hack in.

The ship was built by Lockheed Martin with the aim of creating a market for fast, agile and stealthy ships.

But the cyber security vulnerabilities are something that no one appears to want to talk about.

A US Defence Department spokesperson told Reuters that the Pentagon’s chief weapons test agency addressed “information assurance vulnerabilities” for the Littoral Combat Ship in an assessment provided to the Navy. But details of that assessment are classified.

Lockheed insists that the company is working with the Navy to ensure that USS Freedom’s networks are secure.

The scale of the problem becomes clearer when you realise that the US plans to buy 52 of the new LCS warships in coming years. 

US Navy recruits WoW to fight off pirates

The US Navy is taking a leaf out of the World of Warcraft book and using the game structure to deal with pirates.

While it would be tempting to think that they are neutralising pirates by parachuting in PCs and copies of the game, thus rendering them useless, apparently it is a bit more convoluted than that.

To fight piracy off the coast of Africa the US Navy has created a “World of Warcraft”-like multiplayer game called MMOWGLI. It brings in boffins from around the government into a virtual environment where they can work together in developing strategies to thwart modern-day buccaneers.

Dubbed “Massive Multiplayer Online Wargame Leveraging the Internet,” it has been developed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

According to MSN the brains behind it hope to expand the program beyond piracy, and use it to solve some of the world’s most difficult military problems.

Players are drawn from universities, defence, government and nongovernment outfits.

At the moment they are working their way through a piracy scenario. Once they have experience, and a bit of gold, they can take on bigger problems like Afghanistan and the rise of the Undead from Berkshire. 

US warship blows up kayak with high-energy laser

The US Navy has used a laser gun to blow up a boat at sea.

A warship equipped with a high-energy laser, or HEL, not HEK, has targeted a test boat off the coast of California and set its engines on fire. The idea is that HELs mounted on warships could keep smaller attack boats at bay – we guess including  protecting Guybrush Threepwood and his crew around the Horn of Africa.

The BBC says that HELs have been used before, but they’ve focused on shooting  down missiles or attacking land-lubbers. But effectively using a high energy laser at sea has proved difficult. Auntie has a video here.

Although lasers as a weapon have been researched by the US for some time, they were clunky systems which emitted chemical waste. Moist sea air meant lasers fired on water were less powerful. 

It is early days yet. The Office of Naval Research says there is a lot that needs to be done before lasers can be both efficient and safe at sea. But the first shot fired “provides an important data point as we move toward putting directed energy on warships.”

Peter Morrison from The Office of Naval Research didn’t say anything about having the best job in the world but we can say with the efficiency of a 1970s prototype he’s probably thinking it.

US Navy learns the terrors of outsourcing to HP

The glorious US navy, whose first action involved firing two cannon balls into an undefended English town while trying to help the French, is fast discovering that an outsourcing contract with HP is worse than a deal with the devil.

The Navy had a ten year contract with HP to lease its PCs and apparently is fed up to the back teeth with it.  Wired tells us that the Navy is fed up with mail inboxes that are smaller than Gmail, losing their networks for days while Office 2007 is installed. 

But it seems that the Navy can’t get rid of the maker of expensive printer ink and has had to sign another five year deal while it weans itself off the outfit.  This involves buying all the gear that it has been using from HP for another $1.6 billion and to licence all the documents needed to run the thing. 

Any savings from outsources are going to be lost just getting a basic communications package insourced again.

One Navy deepthroat said that HP had the Navy by its cannon balls and the only choice it had was pay up or send in the Marines. Actually it would have been more useful to sink HP using entirely soft porn stars, but that seems to have been done already.

The idea behind the original project was brilliant.  Dubbed Navy Marine Corps Intranet it was all designed to combine a hodgepodge of 15,000 different systems into a single, manageable network. EDS would own all the gear and operate it all for the Navy. It was supposed to cost $4.1 billion for five years.

It has grown to become the second largest network in the world, next to the internet and connects 700,000 sailors, marines and civilians on nearly 400,000 computers in 620 locations throughout the United States. Japan and Cuba are connected.

NMCI’s 4,100 servers handle more than 2.3 petabytes of data. The project was a success in that the old networks were merged into one centrally-controlled network that is far easier to operate.

But the whole thing has proved about as flexible as an aircraft carrier sailing up the Thames and it is impossible to get HP to deal with problems on Navy time.  In short it is a self policing monopoly that does what it likes.

HP, which bought EDS, still operates under performance metrics set a decade ago which was when a typical workstation on the network costs the Navy $2,490.72 per year and needed an e-mail inbox with a 50-MB capacity.

It costs the Navy $4,085.64 to use a “high-end graphics” workstation and a classified Ethernet port can cost $9,300 to $28,800 per year.

When asked to take security measures that are common today but were not 10 years ago, like hard disk encryption, threat heuristics, and network access control it says no.

HP claims that  87.5 percent of NMCI users surveyed said they’re happy with the service, however as Wired pointed out among the Marines NMCI’s means “No More Contracted Infosystems,” “Non Mission-Capable Internet” and “Never Mind Crash Imminent.”

The Government Accountability Office moaned  in 2006 that after investing about six years and $3.7 billion on NMCI, the Navy has yet to meet the programme’s goals.

In 2008, Navy officials declared their intention to finally assume day-to-day control of the networks. Then they changed their mind when they realised that they did not really know how.
Then they realised that all the IP was owned by HP. Without that information, the Navy couldn’t really begin to plan for the Navy’s Next Generation Enterprise Network, or NGEN.

It all looks a total mess with the Navy being left all at sea by HP

US Navy learns the terrors of outsourcing to HP

Would prefer to be rammed by a scud missile

The glorious US navy, whose first action involved firing two cannon balls into an undefended English town while trying to help the French, is fast discovering that an outsourcing contract with HP is worse than a deal with the devil.

The Navy had a ten year contract with HP to lease its PCs and apparently is fed up to the back teeth with it. Wired tells us that the Navy is fed up with mail inboxes that are smaller than Gmail, losing their networks for days while Office 2007 is installed.

But it seems that the Navy can’t get rid of the maker of expensive printer ink and has had to sign another five year deal while it weans itself off the outfit. This involves buying all the gear that it has been using from HP for another $1.6 billion and to licence all the documents needed to run the thing.

All up any savings from outsources are going to be lost just getting a basic communications package insourced again.

One Navy deep throat said that HP had the Navy by its cannon balls and the only choice it had was pay up or send in the Marines. Actually it would have been more useful to sink HP using entirely soft porn stars, but that seems to have been done already.

The idea behind the original project was brilliant. Dubbed Navy Marine Corps Intranet it was all designed to combine a hodgepodge of 15,000 different systems into a single, manageable network. EDS would own all the gear and operate it all for the Navy. It was supposed to cost $4.1 billion for five years.

It has grown to become the second largest network in the world, next to the Internet and connects 700,000 sailors, marines and civilians on nearly 400,000 computers in 620 locations throughout the United States, Japan and Cuba are connected.

NMCI’s 4,100 servers handle more than 2.3 petabytes of data. The project was a success in that the old networks were merged into one centrally-controlled network is far easier to operate.

But the whole thing has proved about as flexible as an aircraft carrier sailing up the Thames and it is impossible to get HP to deal with problems on Navy time. In short it is a self policing monopoly that does what it likes.

HP, which bought EDS still operates under performance metrics set a decade ago which was when a typical workstation on the network costs the Navy $2,490.72 per year and needed an e-mail inbox with a 50-MB capacity.

It costs the Navy $4,085.64 to use a “high-end graphics” workstation sets the Navy back and a classified Ethernet port can cost $9,300 to $28,800 per year.

When asked to take security measures that are common today but were not 10 years ago, like hard disk encryption, threat heuristics, and network access control it says no.

HP claims that 87.5 percent of NMCI users surveyed said they’re happy with the service, however as Wired pointed out amoung the Marines NMCI’s means “No More Contracted Infosystems,” “Non Mission-Capable Internet,” “Never Mind Crash Imminent.”

The Government Accountability Office moaned in 2006 that after investing about six years and $3.7 billion on NMCI, the Navy has yet to meet the programme’s goals.

In 2008, Navy officials declared their intention to finally assume day-to-day control of their networks. Then they changed their mind when they realised that they did not really know how.

Then they realised that all the IP was owned by HP. Without that information, the Navy couldn’t really begin to plan for the Navy’s Next Generation Enterprise Network, or NGEN.

It all looks a total mess with the Navy being left all at sea by HP

Read More http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/08/hp-holds-navy-network-hostage/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+wired/index+(Wired:+Index+3+(Top+Stories+2))#ixzz0yBg6lBni