Tag: 3D

North American cinemas struggle to cope with 3D strain

Following the immense success of 3D eye candy Avatar in the cinemas, studios stateside are going hog wild to get the next visually stunning 3D blockbusters out, says the Wall Street Journal, but there aren’t enough cinemas to go around.

There are more than 20 3D releases on the way this year with more announcements to follow – though the WSJ reckons the huge budgets required for each film are likely to end up “cannibalising” each other, especially considering so far under 10% of the US’ cinemas are actually 3D enabled.

About 250 3D enabled screens are being added each month to keep up with the trend. While this should provide enough cinemas for the holiday seasons, it’s going to be a rough few months coming up. Toy Story 3, Despicable Me, How to Train Your Dragon, Alice in Wonderland and Clash of the Titans are all on their way out soon, and it’s unlikely the theatres will be able to cope with the strain.

It’s no wonder the studios are rushing to get their pictures turned 3D, with some studios making last-ditch attempts to convert their films for the technology: it’s tough to pirate 3D films. People are going to the pictures in droves to umm, oohh and ahh at the pretty tech on screen, something a Googled torrent is at the moment unable to provide.

Sony launches Blu-ray stand alone player

Sony has started shipping a Blu-ray stand alone player in the USA that will cost $250 and be 3D ready.

In all, Sony is selling five units, the $250 BDP-570, the BDP-S470 at $200, and the BDP=S370 at $180. It’s also selling the $650 BDV-E770W Home Theatre system, and the BDV-E570, which costs $550.

The BDP-S470 player will have a firmware update for 3D available in summer. The unit includes built in wi-fi wireless, and application called BD Remote from the Apple App store that will let people control the player using an iPhone or an iPod.

When connected to a broadband network the machines will stream movies, videos and music from 25 providers including YouTube and Amazon using the Sony Bravia Internet Video platform.

Here’s a list of the features each player has:

BDP-S570 Blu-ray Disc Player

  •     Available in February for about $250
  •     Full HD 1080p single-disc Blu-ray Disc, DVD, CD, SA-CD player
  •     Blu-ray 3D ready (with firmware update available this summer)
  •     BRAVIA Monolithic Design
  •     BRAVIA Internet Video and BD-LIVE(TM)
  •     IP Content Noise Reduction
  •     Built-in Wi-Fi® Wireless (802.11) with Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS)
  •     Entertainment Database Browser with Gracenote technology
  •     BD Remote (iPhone/iPod touch remote control – free app.)
  •     Photo/music/video playback via USB and DLNA® (with firmware update)
  •     DVD upscaling to 1080p with Precision Cinema HD Upscaling
  •     Dolby® TrueHD and dts®-HD Master Audio(TM) decoding
  •     Built-in 1GB Memory

  BDP-S470 Blu-ray Disc Player

  •     Available in February for about $200
  •     Full HD 1080p single-disc Blu-ray Disc, DVD, CD, SA-CD player
  •     Blu-ray 3D ready (with firmware update available this summer)
  •     BRAVIA Monolithic Design
  •     BRAVIA Internet Video and BD-LIVE
  •     Wireless LAN Ready (USB wireless LAN adapter sold separately)
  •     Entertainment Database Browser with Gracenote technology
  •     BD Remote (iPhone/iPod touch remote control – free app.)
  •     Photo/music/video playback via USB and DLNA (with firmware update)
  •     DVD upscaling to 1080p with Precision Cinema HD Upscaling
  •     Dolby TrueHD and dts-HD Master Audio decoding

  BDP-S370 Blu-ray Disc Player

  •     Available in February for about $180
  •     Full HD 1080p single-disc Blu-ray Disc, DVD, CD, SA-CD player
  •     BRAVIA Monolithic Design
  •     BRAVIA Internet Video and BD-LIVE
  •     Entertainment Database Browser with Gracenote technology
  •     Wireless LAN Ready (USB wireless LAN adapter sold separately)
  •     BD Remote (iPhone/iPod touch remote control – free app.)
  •     Photo/music/video playback via USB and DLNA (with firmware update)
  •     DVD upscaling to 1080p with Precision Cinema HD Upscaling
  •     Dolby TrueHD and dts-HD Master Audio decoding

  BDV-E770W Blu-ray Disc(TM) Home Theater System

  •     Available in March for about $650
  •     1000W Full HD 1080p Blu-ray Disc, DVD, CD, SA-CD 5.1 channel home
  •       theater system
  •     Blu-ray 3D ready (with firmware update available this summer)
  •     BRAVIA Monolithic Design
  •     BRAVIA Internet Video and BD-LIVE
  •     IP Content Noise Reduction
  •     Integrated S-AIR(TM) Wireless Rear Speaker
  •     Wireless LAN Ready with included USB Wireless LAN adapter (802.11)
  •     Entertainment Database Browser with Gracenote technology
  •     BD Remote (iPhone/iPod touch remote control – free app.)
  •     Photo/Music/Video Playback via USB and DLNA (with firmware update)
  •     iPod audio playback via USB
  •     DVD upscaling to 1080p with Precision Cinema HD Upscaling
  •     Dolby TrueHD and dts-HD Master Audio decoding
  •     Built-in 1GB Memory

  BDV-E570 Blu-ray Disc Home Theater System

  •   Available in March for about $550
  •     1000W Full HD 1080p Blu-ray Disc(TM), DVD, CD, SA-CD 5.1 channel    home  theater system
  •     Blu-ray 3D ready (with firmware update available this summer)
  •     Monolithic Design
  •     BRAVIA Internet Video and BD-LIVE
  •     S-AIR ready for wireless rear and wireless multi-room speakers (sold separately)
  •     Wireless LAN Ready with included USB Wireless LAN adapter (802.11)
  •     Entertainment Database Browser with Gracenote technology
  •     BD Remote (iPhone/iPod touch remote control – free app.)
  •     Photo/Music/Video Playback via USB and DLNA (with firmware update)
  •     iPod audio playback via USB
  •     DVD upscaling to 1080p with Precision Cinema HD Upscaling
  •     Dolby TrueHD and dts-HD Master Audio decoding
  •     Built-in 1GB Memory

3D football shown in nine pubs

The world’s first 3D football game was televised yesterday in nine pubs across the UK. 

The screenings at top secret venues – withheld from public knowledge due to an expected stampede of punters – were overall deemed a great success. It is now likely that Sky’s pilot scheme will be followed by a roll-out of 3D sports events into viewer’s homes over the course of the year.

Sky logoWhile it was presumed by many that the sight of Wayne Rooney’s Shrek-like visage, in three harrowing dimensions, would provoke scenes of wide-spread panic reminiscent of the screening of the Hindenburg crash, such worries were quickly proved unfounded as viewers gawped in awe at the deep purple of hue of Sir Alex Ferguson’s nose.

Arsenal fan Alan Howe told the Daily Mirror that he was surprised by just how effective the new technology is:  “I have HD at home and I thought nothing could get better than that. It’s mind-boggling.”

With films such as Avatar ushering in the 3D era it is widely held that the technology will not be the play thing for mega-rich Hollywood producers for much longer.  While the first 3D camcorder is on sale from Panasonic at a prohibitively expensive $21,000, 3D TV sets will be available at more attainable £700-£1,000 prices in the near future, with plans from Samsung to mass produce the 3D glasses themselves likely to lower retail cost.

Sky plans to show 3D Premier League matches in hundreds more pubs before the end of the football season.

Tegra 2 to have multiple high profile design wins

When the chips are down, it may be time to change your betting strategy, something Nvidia knows all too well after a few major ups and downs.

But the graphics giant must be feeling quite proud of itself of late, as it watches the blood, sweat and tears poured into Tegra finally starting to yield results, in this, Jensen’s “year of the tablet.”

Not only has Tegra managed to worm its way into all sorts of cool gadgetry in the last couple of quarters – like the Zune HD and Boxee Box for instance – Tegra 2, the new version of the little low powered chip, looks set to take on the world, with ODMs purportedly lining up at Nvidia’s door.

Offering the same 1080p HD video capabilities as its predecessor, Tegra 2, which is made on the rather ill-fated 40nm process, can also stream video live from the web for about six hours, play up to about 12 hours of stored HD video, handle 3D graphics, Adobe Flash and even voice capability for 20 times less power than ye-old-common PC. Not too shabby.

Intel’s Atom can’t handle 1080p yet. And neither, by the way, can Qualcomm’s Snapdragon.

With Tegra 1 Having already been bunged into car info-tainment systems galore, music players you’ve never heard of (except the Zune of course) and a slew of Korean smart phones, Tegra 2 is now apparently ready for the big time.

With four times the performance of its older brother, Tech Eye was told by a source close to Nvidia that the chip was “f***ing hard to make,” and didn’t come cheap either, with around $600 million having been plowed into its development and 500 N-gineers slaving away in the green queen’s dungeon.

But with the likes of MSI coming out with an Nvidia Tegra-based tablet in Q2, and our source telling us that “every major PC maker will be including Tegra in its tablet line-up this year,” (and that includes Dell) it seems Jensen’s gamble has paid off. In dividends.

Just a shame Apple’s Ipad couldn’t be bothered to use the chip instead of settling for an inferior PA Semi design only capable of 720p.

Samsung starts mass producing 3D TV glass

Giant manufacturing combine Samsung said it has started making panels for 3D LED TVs and 3D LCD TCs.

It’s started making panels for 40-inch, 46-inch and 55-inch HD 3D TVs that use its 240Hz technology and will need “3D Active Glasses”.

The 240Hz technology operates at 240 frames a second and Samsung claims delivers full HD viewing in 2D and smooth full HD 3D images.

3D nightmareThe response time of the LCD and LED panels has been cut by 20 percent to less than four milliseconds. That, said Samsung eliminates interference between right eye and left eye images.

The 3D Active Glasses technology is a standard approved by the Consumer Electronics Association. Rather than use polarised glass, 3D Active Glass tech blocks the left and then the right lens when images are displayed to give more lifelike 3D images.

Sounds like a recipe for a headache, but Samsung like other panel makers hopes the 3D market will be worth $17 billion a year in 2018.

3D movie claims first casualty

The high tech 3D flick Avatar is officially responsible for the death of a bloke in Taiwan.

The 42-year-old apparently snuffed it after a stroke, which his quacks think was triggered by watching  the blockbuster Avatar in 3D.

Authorities have only identified the man by his surname Kuo.  He started feeling sick during the screening and was taken to hospital in the northern city of Hsinchu.

By the time he got to the hospital he was unconscious and his brain was haemorrhaging.  He died 11 days later.

Doctor Peng Chin-chih said the over-excitement from watching the movie triggered his symptoms.

China Times newspaper said it was the first death linked to watching James Cameron’s science-fiction epic Avatar.  Other news sources have complained that the 3D technology causes headaches, dizziness, nausea and blurry eyesight.

We don’t think it has anything to do with the technology. We had the same symptoms when we saw Cameron’s Titanic but that might have had something to with the combination of Celine Dion, Leonardo DiCaprio, and several pints of Old Bastard.