Google to support Klingon languages

Software king of the world Microsoft has been having a giggle at Google’s decision to no longer support H.264 HTML5 video playback in Chrome.

Yesterday Google announced that it will only support open-sauce technologies such as its own WebM initiative, with its super dooper VP8 codec and the Theora video codec, which is used by Firefox.

The announcement read: “We expect even more rapid innovation in the web media platform in the coming year and are focusing our investments in those technologies that are developed and licensed based on open web principles. To that end, we are changing Chrome’s HTML5 support to make it consistent with the codecs already supported by the open Chromium project. Specifically, we are supporting the WebM (VP8) and Theora video codecs, and will consider adding support for other high-quality open codecs in the future. Though H.264 plays an important role in video, as our goal is to enable open innovation, support for the codec will be removed and our resources directed towards completely open codec technologies.”

With language like that, it was begging for a piss take and it seems that Microsoft was ready to oblige.

Writing in his bog, Tim Sneath, director of the Windows and Silverlight technical evangelism team, cut and pasted the Google announcement and replaced the video codecs with spoken languages.

His post describes how it expects more communication between people in the coming year and are therefore focusing our investments in “languages that are created based on constructed language principles”.

As a result, paraphrased Sneath Google was changing the “spoken and written language of this nation to make it consistent with the form of speech already supported by the Language Creation Society”.

“Specifically, we are supporting the Esperanto and Klingon languages, and will consider adding support for other high-quality constructed languages in the future. Though English plays an important role in speech today, as our goal is to enable open innovation, its further use as a form of communication in this country will be prohibited and our resources directed towards languages that are untainted by real-world usage.”