Nokia Siemens denies flogging "surveillance technology" to Iranians

Nokia Siemens has denied that it flogged telecom spying gear to Iran which helped the regime persecute and arrest dissidents.

Finnish company Nokia and German company Siemens set up a joint alliance in 2006.

Euro MPs yesterday slammed Nokia’s involvement in Iran in flogging spying technology.

But the outfit said that the implication that it had provided censorship technology was “wrong”.

True, there might be shedloads of people who are behind bars and being tortured thanks to gear with a Nokia Siemens brand on it, but it was all perfectly legal.

A Nokia Siemen’s spokesman said that the outfit will be clarifying any inaccuracy in the EU’s understanding its business in Iran.

Nokia Siemens said the technology that it had installed was similar to that used “in all EU member states and the US” although given the paranoia in those countries that does not reassure us much.

Its argument is that the gear was lawful, and as it set it up it was not used to monitor, filter or censor the internet.

Of course when the network is up and running it has a standard surveillance capability.

This very basic system was called Monitoring Centre and can be used to monitor local telephone calls.

It cannot track keywords and its ability is somewhat limited.

MEPs are calling for the EU to ban similar exports to “governments and countries such as Iran”.

 

Nokia Siemens denies flogging “surveillance technology” to Iranians

Euro MPs are furious

 

Nokia Siemens has denied that it flogged surveillance gear to Iran which helped the regime persecute and arrest dissidents.

Euro MPs yesterday slammed Nokia’s involvement in Iran in flogging spying technology.

The outfit said that the implication that it had provided censorship technology was “wrong”.

True, there might be shedloads of people who are behind bars and being tortured thanks to gear with a Nokia Siemens brand on it, but it was all perfectly legal.

A Nokia Siemen’s spokesman said that the outfit will be clarifying any inaccuracy in the EU’s understanding its business in Iran.

Nokia Siemens said the technology that it had installed was similar to that used “in all EU member states and the US” although given the paranoia in those countries that does not reassure us much.

Its argument is that the gear was lawful, and as it set it up it was not used to monitor, filter or censor the internet.

Of course when the network is up and running it has a standard surveillance capability.

This very basic system was called Monitoring Centre and can be used to monitor local telephone calls.

It cannot track keywords and its ability is somewhat limited.

MEPs are calling for the EU to ban similar exports to “governments and countries such as Iran”.