Human rights group wades into web host on blog shut down

Humans Rights groups are looking at court action on behalf of the 70,000 who lost their blogs after the FBI complained that one of them had terrorist bomb making instructions on it.

Blogetery.com is a small blogging platform based in Toronto, which got shut down by its web host Burst.net.

FBI agents claimed that Blogetery was home to links that led to bomb-making tips and the names of Americans targeted for assassination by al-Qaeda.

Joe Marr, Burst.net’s chief technology officer, said that the company is considering its options and there’s a chance executives there could hand over a copy of most of the information found on Blogetery’s server.  But if it doesn’t, it does not have to.

This means that the service’s users could see their blogs again but Blogetery is toast as far as that web host is concerned.

Alexander Yusupov, Blogetery’s owner and sole employee, said in an interview with CNET that he “moderated the blogs on his server every day.” But admited he wasn’t aware his site had been taken offline by Burst.net until two days later.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, an advocacy group for tech companies and internet users said that regardless of whether Yusupov was pants at maintaining his service, it’s unfair to stuff up the lives of thousands of Blogetery users.

Kurt Opsahl, a senior staff attorney said that it was a shame and unfair to all the people using Blogetery for ordinary blogging services.

The web host says now that the FBI had nothing to do with shutting down the site, something which back tracks on what it said earlier.

Yusupov said he’s preparing to defend himself. He said he’s looking for a copyright and internet laywer. He denies ever seeing any terrorist content on his blogs and he wants to see what evidence anyone has against the site.

He said that the normal practice is to suspend the server and contact the owner to resolve the situation. Not simply ‘kill’ the service without any prior warning or notification.”

 

Human rights groups wade into on blog shut down

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Humans Rights groups are preparing court action on behalf of the 70,000 who lost their blogs after the FBI complained that one of them had terrorist bomb making instructions on it.
Blogetery.com, is a small blogging platform based in Toronto, which shut down on July 9 by Burst.net, its Web host.

FBI agents claimed that Blogetery was home to links that led to bomb-making tips and the names of Americans targeted for assassination by al-Qaeda.

Joe Marr, Burst.net’s chief technology officer, said that the company is considering its options and there’s a chance executives there could hand over a copy of most of the information found on Blogetery’s server.

While this means that the service’s users could see their blogs again but Blogetery is toast on that ISP.

Alexander Yusupov, Blogetery’s owner and sole employee, said in an interview with CNET that he “moderated the blogs on his server every day.” But admited he wasn’t aware his site had been taken offline by Burst.net until two days later. Yusupov, has not been accused of any wrongdoing by the FBI.

From Burst.net’s point of view, if Blogetery users don’t get their data back, the person responsible is the owner.

But the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an advocacy group for tech companies and Internet users said that regardless of whether Yusupov was diligent enough in maintaining his service, it’s unfair to penalize thousands of Blogetery users.

Kurt Opsahl, a senior staff attorney said that it was a shame and unfair to all the people using Blogetery for ordinary blogging services.

The ISP ays now that the FBI had nothing to do with shutting down the site.

Yusupov said he’s preparing to defend himself. He said he’s looking for a copyright and Internet attorney. He denies ever seeing any terrorist content on his platform.

He said that the normal practice is to suspend the server and contact the owner to resolve the situation. Not simply ‘kill’ the service without any prior warning or notification.”