Submerge your supercomputer in liquid

Yellow-Submarine-HeaderA team of boffins have discovered that if you take your supercomputer and immerse it in tanks of liquid coolant you can make it super efficient.

The Vienna Science Cluster uses immersion cooling which involves putting  SuperMicro servers into a dielectric fluid similar to mineral oil.

The servers are slid vertically into slots in the tank, which is filled with 250 gallons of ElectroSafe fluid, which transfers heat almost as well as water but doesn’t conduct an electric charge.

The Vienna Science Cluster 3 system has a mechanical Power Usage Effectiveness rating of just 1.02, meaning the cooling system overhead is just 2 percent of the energy delivered to the system.

This means that 600 teraflops of computing power uses just 540 kilowatts of power and 1,000 square feet of space.

Christiaan Best, CEO and founder of Green Revolution Cooling, which designed the immersion cooling system. “It is particularly impressive given that it uses zero water. We believe this is a first in the industry.”

Most data centres cool IT equipment using air, while liquid cooling has been used primarily in high-performance computing (HPC). But cloud computing and “big data,” could make liquid cooling relevant for a larger pool of data centre operators.

The Vienna design combines a water-less approach with immersion cooling, which has proven effective for cooling high-density server configurations, including high-performance computing clusters for academic computing, and seismic imaging for energy companies.