Munich might still stick to Linux agreement

The poster child for the use of Linux by government authorities, the City of Munich, might stick to its commitment to the operating system after all.

There had been ructions in Munich over whether its move to Linux had been such a good idea and if it had saved as much as it thought it had.

Most media have reported that a final call was made to halt the LiMux and switch back to Microsoft software, but the Free Software Foundation Europe says this is fake news.

What happened was that the opposing parties were overruled, but the decision was amended such that a strategy document must specify which LiMux-applications will no longer be needed. This was not killing off the project but postponing it until more facts were known such as the extent in which prior investments must be written off, and a rough calculation of the overall costs of the desired unification.

The FSFE said that so far mayor Dieter Reiter was forced to postpone the final decision, and this was possible through the unwavering pressure created by joint efforts between The Document Foundation, KDE, OSBA, and the FSFE together with all the individuals who wrote to city council members and took the issue to the media.

Although the mandate hints that the existing vendor-neutral approach is to be replaced with a proprietary solution, it leaves the door open.

Some politicians said they’d never received this much input from the public before, and the Free Software Foundation Europe says the city’s issues were caused “from organisational problems, including lack of clear structures and responsibilities,” which should not be attributed to the Linux operating system.

“LiMux as such is still one of the best examples of how to create a vendor-neutral administration based on Free Software,” the FSFE said.