Leave encryption alone says Apple’s supreme dalek

apple-dalek-2Apple supreme dalek Tim Cook has issued a defence of strong encryption which will get Washington spooks a little hot under the collar.

Tim slammed a campaign led in part by FBI director James Comey to require adding backdoors—intentional weaknesses in the encryption code—for law enforcement to encryption technology.

If Comey gets his way, Apple will have to provide US spooks with the backdoors to the encryption used in Apple’s iPhone devices. This will save them ten minutes trying to work their way past Apple security, which is not exactly the hardest in the world to knock over.

Cook said that adding encryption backdoors for law enforcement would weaken the security of all devices and “is incredibly dangerous.”

The audience at the Electronic Privacy Information Centre awards dinner, which was honouring a variety of privacy experts and activists, reportedly responded warmly to Cook’s words.

“So let me be crystal clear: Weakening encryption or taking it away harms good people who are using it for the right reason,” he said.

Cook, is backed by politicians Ted Lieu, who is a democrat and Will Hurd who is a Republican. Both members of the Information Technology Subcommittee in the House of Representatives.

Although debate over the USA Patriot Act and the bill mean to reform it, the USA Freedom Act, currently dominate attention in congress, it’s clear that the increasingly loud debate over encryption is soon going to gain a far brighter spotlight as both the FBI and technology sectors continue to clash.