Bad online experiences affect life

O2-BMD-Stick-LifeA new Microsoft survey show nearly two-thirds of people surveyed had at least one negative online experience that had an impact on them in the real world.

Apparently, if you have a bad online experience it can result in side-effects including loss of trust in others, increased stress or sleep deprivation and thinking oranges might make good political leaders (we made the last one up).

The study, “Civility, Safety and Interaction Online – 2016,” polled youths aged 13 to 17 and adults aged 18 to 74 in 14 countries. Nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of those polled said they had fallen victim at some point to at least one of 17 different online risks.

That figure grows to 78 percent when respondents included the online experiences of their friends and families. Half of those surveyed reported being “extremely or very” worried about online risks generally, with the most common concerns being unwanted contact (43 percent) and various forms of harassment (39 percent).

Young people said they were more likely to suffer social and academic losses following some sort of online conflict. More than 20 percent said they lost a friend or their scholastic performance suffered, while 13 percent said they intentionally spent less time at school due to online conflicts.

Both adults and teens said they became less trusting of others in the real world after a negative interaction online at about an even rate. For adults, it was 31 percent, for teens 29 percent. However, consequences to adults outpaced those to teens, such as becoming less trusting of people online and a reluctance to participate in blogs and other online forums.

It was not all bad. More than 29 percent of adults said they tried to be more constructive in their criticism of others after a negative online situation, compared with 25 percent of teens.

The full report will be out early next year.

A top vole said Microsoft had chosen to make this preliminary release, featuring some adult data, following the conclusion of the U.S. presidential election and in conjunction with World Kindness Day on 13 November.

The months leading up to the new year and Safer Internet Day 2017 represent an opportunity for a “digital reset… to ensure we’re putting our best digital foot forward … Digital civility is everyone’s responsibility, and Microsoft can help put you and your family on a path to good digital citizenship.”