Saudi bloke sold dodgy computer bits to the US Marines

The US Marines  might want to re-think its policy about buying computer gear from Arabs peddling goods from the back of a station wagon in a pub car park.

Ehab Ashoor, 48, who lived in Sugar Land, Texas was caught during a federal crackdown on a shady businesses that supplies shoddy computer goods to the military and federal agencies.

Judge David Hittner of United States District Court sentenced Ashoor to 51 months porridge.

Prosecutors claimed that Ashoor had shown disregard for the men and women serving in Iraq. In true “blind American Justice” Hittner pointed out that “they’re obviously not his men and women” and insisted that Ashoor, who had lived in the US for 20 years, be deported after he does his sentence.

But other than the fact he was flogging gear to the marines it was a fairly straight piracy case. Ashoor bought 200 counterfeit Cisco networking cards off eBay in Hong Kong.

The cards are used in helicopters, airplanes and computer equipment to transmit data about troop movements and other sensitive information.

John Morton, assistant secretary of homeland security said that Ashoor was getting rich and didn’t care about what goes into airplanes and helicopters in Iraq and Afghanistan.

We would say that the case proves that neither does the Marines.

Ashoor’s company, CDS Federal, bought the cards on eBay for $25 each in July 2008 and charged the Marine Corps $625 each. The fact that the Marines were paying $625 for a network card leads us to be believe that while Ashoor was taking them for a ride, they were pretty dumb.

Mr. Ashoor’s wife, Nargus Khan, 40, said they had lived in the United States for 20 years and had two children, but had remained citizens of Saudi Arabia. She said the family now faced financial hardship. Ashoor was forced to pay Cisco $119,000 in restitution.

The parts were never used. Customs agents noticed something amiss with the shipment and referred it to investigators.

Saudi bloke sold dodgey computers to the US Marines

Never mind the quality feel the width

 

The US Marine Corp might be wanting to re-think its policy about buying computer gear from Arabs peddling goods from the back of a station wagon in a pub car park.

A Saudi man was sentenced Thursday to four years in prison for selling counterfeit computer parts to the Marine Corps for use in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Ehab Ashoor, 48, who lived in Sugar Land, Texas was caught during a federal crackdown on shady businesses that supply shoddy computer goods to the military and federal agencies.

Judge David Hittner of United States District Court sentenced Ashoor to 51 months porridge.

Prosecutors claimed that Ashoor had shown disregard for the men and women serving in Iraq. In true “blind American Justice” Hittner pointed out that “they’re obviously not his men and women” and insisted that Ashoor, who had lived in the US for 20 years, be deported after he does his sentence.

But other than the fact he was flogging gear to the marines it was a fairly straight piracy case. Ashoor bought 200 counterfeit Cisco networking cards off ebay in Hong Kong.

The cards are used in helicopters, airplanes and computer equipment to transmit data about troop movements and other sensitive information.

John Morton, assistant secretary of homeland security said that Ashoor was getting rich and didn’t care about what goes into airplanes and helicopters in Iraq and Afghanistan.

We would say that the case proves that neither does the Marines.

Ashoor’s company, CDS Federal, bought the cards on eBay for $25 each in July 2008 and charged the Marine Corps $625 each. The fact that the Marines were paying $625 for a network card leads us to be believe that while Ashoor was taking them for a ride, they were pretty dumb.

Mr. Ashoor’s wife, Nargus Khan, 40, said they had lived in the United States for 20 years and had two children, but had remained citizens of Saudi Arabia. She said the family now faced financial hardshipAshoor was forced to pay Cisco $119,000 in restitution.

The parts were never used. Customs agents noticed something amiss with the shipment and referred it to investigators.