Intel will take months to change its own Sandy Bridge chipset

You have just got to respect Paul Otellini, the CEO of Intel, and we do. Personally, I respect him because he used the phrase “crossing the Rubicon” while Andy Grove was still in situ.  Plus he replies to emails we send him. Very much to his credit. We asked him about Intel Sandy Bridge chipsets. He responded. Promptly. The spinners are still spinning trying to explain the Sandy Bridge chipset problem to TechEye. Extremely.

We have a problem with Sandy Bridge, but not nearly as much of a problem as Intel has.  We are still trying to review it, two months on. It launched Sandy Bridge early, and while the CPU was fine, the chipset was defective. Unfortunately, Intel will not be able to upgrade the chipset on its high end Extreme mobos until April, TechEye has learned. Sandy Bridge got adulatory reviews from tech sites that didn’t notice the chipset was screwed. Two months on, TechEye is stil trying to make a system work.

Official spinner Dan Snyder came up with this formula – answering repeated questions from TechEye about when Intel would update its mobos.

“Of course we are supporting all our customers and end users fully.  In the case of tech reviewers under NDA who have been provided Intel Six-series chipset motherboard samples free of charge from us for review, we are asking that they use SATA ports 0 and 1 with existing boards as they do their reviews.  But if they will have a need for other SATA ports or have any concerns at all, work with their local PR manager as always — we fully support and respond to the needs of tech press, as well as end users.  Note that each ODM/OEM — Asus, Gigabyte, etc, will have their own support and sales strategies, fully supported by their Intel sales teams.”

So Intel’s partners are better than Intel at producing chipsets? We do wonder about adulatory reviews of Sandy Bridge by technically far more competent websites than TechEye. So far it has taken Intel a hell of a time to fix its chipset so its partners are better than it. What about the chipset replacement on the Intel mobos? This is way down the line, we are given to understand. So much for bins.  Some have suggested Intel can’t do it and have called in its Taiwanese partners. We understand differently.

We contacted Intel. It refused to comment on why its own motherboards don’t work with Sandy Bridge.  It might be April, it might be May. That’s pretty extreme! Hopefully you did not pay for the premium bins…