Tame Apple Press reports that Apple Music is bad

a8a442ac275a36c2da0b85a42b625225The writing appears to be on the wall for Apple Music after one of Jobs’ Mob’s cheerleaders the New Yorker dismissed the Apple Streaming service as “bad.”

To put this into perspective, the article has the headline “Why Apple Music is so bad when the iPhone is so good,” thus providing Jobs’ Mob with a free advert for its self-reverential out-of-date iPhone.

The writer Om Malik’s theme is that Apple can either create great software, or great hardware but when the two need to work side-by-side, like with Apple Music, the result is pants.

“Apple has always been, and always will be, a hardware-first company. It produces beautiful devices with elegant designs and humane operating-system software,” he enthuses without any trace of irony that might otherwise rescue his reasoning.

Malik then makes the very good point that Apple releases two versions of the same hardware a year and this makes sense but it also applies the same refresh programme to software. As a result its software is nearly always out-of-date and unable to cope with the fast adapting software scene.

He said that Apple’s corporate DNA is that of a hardware company, its activities are meant to support hardware sales. For example, its “Made with iPhone” advertising campaign talks up the iPhone’s camera, and thus drives up hardware sales.

“All of Apple’s services, iCloud, Apple Music, Apple Photos, iMessage, exist to support the sales of phones, tables, and laptops. The executive team, the sales machine, and the manufacturing, software, and services components are all locked into the hardware schedule.”

He added that it was daft that the Apple Music update needs to be revealed at the World Wide Developers’ Conference.

“Why should Apple Music have to wait for the conference to make usability fixes when Facebook and Google, and every Internet-services-oriented company, does this on a routine basis?”

Malik describes a hardware company which is trying to be a software company and failing. In much the same way that Microsoft tried to be a hardware company and balls that up.  But what is more interesting from the New Yorker article is that while the premise is obvious, the fact that someone who is blindly an Apple fanboy is saying it.

Apple fanboys are having a tough time of things lately. Not only is their faith tested by the fact that Jobs’ Mob is failing to attract interest, they also have to cope with the fact that they are no longer seen as the industry innovators. Coupled with this, poor programming and software design is making the rather elderly designs look buggy.

In the past, Apple fanboys would never complain, instead they held fast to the reality distortion field even when their Apple Macs were catching fire. All that is starting to change, as Apple’s grip over its follows starts to slip. Without any inquisition, a new messiah, or at the very least good products with good software, we can see more of this coming.

The iPhone 7 will be another good test of this faith.  So far it appears to have little in the way of innovative technology and will look the same as the disappointing iPhone6S. If it contains the same rubbish software that we are being seen coming out of Apple with its Apple Music then that particular cash cow might as well be sent to the meat works.