Apple sued over the only innovation in the iPhone 6S

Old Apple logo - Wikimedia CommonsWhen the iPhone 6S and iWatch came out they was greeted by a loud sounding yawn even though Apple insisted that its haptic technology was worth buying because it was “super, cool and innovative”.

However not only did the iPhone 6S fail to interest so many people as Apple’s earlier models, it would appear that the haptic technology was not that innovative and Apple was not thinking different at all.

Immersion has accused Apple and carrier AT&T of infringement of three of its patents in the latest iPhone models and Apple watches.

Immersion has 2,100 issued or pending patents worldwide covering various aspects and commercial applications of haptic or touch feedback technology, has asked the US International Trade Commission to ban the import of the specified iPhone and

Company CEO Victor Viegas named in the actions the iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, Apple Watch,

Apple Watch Sport and Apple Watch Edition are using its tech, the claim runs.

“While we are pleased to see others in the industry recognize the value of haptics and adopt it in their products, it is important for us to protect our business against infringement of our intellectual property in order to preserve the ecosystem we have built and the investments that we have made in continuing to advance haptic experiences. We will vigorously defend the intellectual property we have developed when it is infringed,” he said.

The Apple Watch has haptic features promoted under the names Force Touch and Taptic Engine, according to the complaint.

The patents involved include No. 8,619,051, which refers to a haptic feedback system with stored effects, and U.S. Patent No. 8,773,356, which refers to a method and apparatus for providing tactile sensations. The complaint also charges the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus with infringing its U.S. Patent No. 8,659,571, which refers to an “Interactivity Model for Shared Feedback on Mobile Devices.”