Youtube cuts giraffe feed because of smut

US puritans in YouTube have shut down a live feed to a giraffe enclosure claiming it is an X-rated hot bed of pornographic necking.

Millions of people have been watching and waiting with anticipation to witness the birth of a baby giraffe at Animal Adventure Park in Harpursville, NY and the park set up a webcam to share the precious and educational moment with the world.

The site attracted more than 20-30 million views in the 12 hours the site was up. It is not surprising as April the giraffe is 15 years old and is expecting a calf with her mate, Oliver.

However, someone contacted YouTube to complain that the site was immoral and packed full of porn. What is amazing is that they found another puritan in YouTube who agreed with them and the site was pulled.

“For the millions of you that have been tuning in to take witness to this educational experience, a live giraffe birth, there are a handful of extremists and animal rights activists that may not agree with us, and that’s okay, but have unfortunately reported our YouTube cam as sexually explicit or nude content, which has made for its removal,” park officials said on Facebook Live.

According to YouTube’s guidelines:

“Sexually explicit content like pornography is not allowed. Videos containing fetish content will be removed or age-restricted depending on the severity of the act in question. In most cases, violent, graphic, or humiliating fetishes are not allowed to be shown on YouTube.”

The announcement seemed to have many viewers puzzled. One person commented, “Does this mean the animals in the zoo will soon be wearing clothes?”

YouTube finally realised that banning educational sites based on the age old puritan tradition of seeing sex, or witches, were there aren’t any was not going to fly and re-instated the live feed probably safe for work. We had a look this morning and it was a giraffe chewing for 10 minutes, we guess it must have turned someone on.

https://www.facebook.com/fox46charlotte/videos/484025361721568/

 

Cellbrite can unlock the iPhone 6 and 6S

Cellebrite has announced that it can unlock and extract the full file system from locked iPhones including the 6 and 6+ with their Advanced Investigative Service (CAIS) product.  Apparently Apple’s encryption is no object.

The Tame Apple Press is furious with the company for daring to prove that hacking an IPhone is a walk in the park and has been running conspiracy stories about how Cellbrite is really an agent of evil government forces who want to take away Apple users Coldplay  and Taylor Swift collections, or something like that.

“Companies like the Israel-based Cellebrite make a mint selling tools to local and federal law enforcement agencies in the United States as well as countries like Turkey, the United Arab Emirates and Russia.,” hissed Reuters.

Every version before the 6+ can also be unlocked by Cellebrite whose forensic researchers say they have successfully bypassed Apple’s so-called impossible to break security and encryption.

CAIS is the in-house product on sale from Cellebrite. They also offer products like the new version of the Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED) Physical Analyzer 6.0 for use in the field by their customers. The company has been increasingly advertising their newest product’s ability to easily extract and investigate data from encrypted secure messengers including Signal, Telegram, Threema and Surespot.

The company charges $1,500 to unlock an individual phone, while a yearly subscription to the service runs for $250,000, according to a report from the Intercept last year.

To top off the new offerings, Cellebrite’s also now targets Uber apps on Android and iOS, a potentially massive source of personal data that includes the user’s account and locations. That’s in addition to the ability to extract and analyze vast mountains of data from apps ranging from Chrome to Facebook to dating apps, all of which can contain extremely private information.

“In most devices, Cellebrite’s proprietary boot loader can bypass all security mechanisms, even if the device is locked, without jailbreaking, rooting or flashing the device,” according to the company.

Tech reporting becomes more negative

A  new report from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) claims that tech reporting was not what it used to be and is now a lot more negative.

The report was based on textual analysis of 250 articles from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post from 1986 to 2013.

Generally the ITIF found that in the 1980s and 1990s, coverage of technology was largely positive, but this changed from the mid-1990s to 2013, when more negative reports covering the downside of technology, its failure to live up to its promises, and potential ill effects, started to appear.

The ITIF thinks that there has been a significant increase in the number of civil-society organisations and attention-seeking scholars focused on painting a threatening picture of technology. Another reason is that news organisations are under increased financial pressure, and thus, reporters may have less time and fewer resources to dig deep into technology issues.

“Since media outlets generate revenue from page views, they have an incentive to pursue alarmist stories that generate clicks.”

Daniel Castro, ITIF’s vice president and the report’s co-author, said: “The way the media portrays any given issue shapes public opinion about it, and that in turn shapes the course of policymaking. So, it is important to ensure that technology coverage airs diverse perspectives without giving any side more weight than is warranted. If technology reporting continues with the trend we’re seeing toward pessimistic — and in some cases technophobic — critiques, it will likely spur policymakers and the public to support even more unnecessary, unwarranted, or unwise policy interventions.”

That still does not explain why the US tech press has its nose firmly planted in the bottoms of key tech companies, particularly Apple. But then, I am just being negative.

Alphabet sues Uber over self-driving car tech

Old carsAlphabet’s Waymo self-driving car unit sued Uber’s autonomous trucking subsidiary Otto over claims that it stole confidential and proprietary sensor technology.

Waymo claims Uber and Otto nicked confidential information on Waymo’s Lidar sensor technology to help speed its own efforts in autonomous technology.

Waymo’s complaint in the Northern District of California said that Uber’s LiDAR technology is actually Waymo’s LiDAR technology.

Uber said that it is considering the allegations.

Lidar, which uses light pulses reflected off objects to gauge their position on or near the road, is a crucial component of autonomous driving systems.

Previous systems have been prohibitively expensive and Waymo sought to design one over 90 percent cheaper, making its Lidar technology among the company’s “most valuable assets,” Waymo said.

Waymo is seeking an unspecified amount of damages and a court order preventing Uber from using its proprietary information.

Otto launched in May, due in part to the high profile of one of its co-founders, Anthony Levandowski, who had been an executive on Google’s self-driving project.

Waymo said that before Levandowski’s resignation in January 2016 from Google he downloaded over 14,000 confidential files, including Lidar circuit board designs, thereby allowing Uber and Otto to fast-track its self-driving technology.

Waymo accused Levandowski of attempting to “erase any forensic fingerprints” by reformatting  his laptop.

“While Waymo developed its custom LiDAR systems with sustained effort over many years, defendants leveraged stolen information to shortcut the process and purportedly build a comparable LiDAR system in only nine months,” the complaint said.

 

HP does well this quarter

The maker of expensive printer ink HP appears to have turned a corner.

It reported a 3.6 percent rise in quarterly revenue, largely helped by a stabilizing PC market. Revenue rose to $12.68 billion from $12.25 billion.

However, the company’s net earnings from continuing operations fell to $611 million in the first quarter ended 31 January from $650 million a year earlier. This indicates that HP is not out of the woods yet.

The results were better than the cocaine nose jobs of Wall Street predicted most expected $11.85 billion in revenue.

HP’s results included personal systems (what HP calls PCs) revenue of $8.25 billion, a 10 percent gain from a year ago. Total PC units sold rose eight percent, with notebook shipments rising 12 percent. Desktop PC sales stayed flat with the year-ago period.

HP’s largest source of profit is the ink and toner business which has been hit by competitors selling less-expensive ink cartridges and a general decline in printing of documents, especially by younger people.

Sales in that segment fell three percent in the latest quarter, improving from a 16 per cent drop in full fiscal year 2016.

Chief Financial Officer Cathie Lesjak said the results were clear proof point that we’re on the march to stabilise supplies, revenue and constant currency by the end of this year.

Mobile Dialog expects good revenue growth

 

The maker of chips for Apple and Samsung said it expected “good revenue growth” in 2017, indicating a bumper year for high end consumer devices.

Dialog Semiconductor depends for about three quarters of its revenues on smartphone makers, in January already reported a five percent rise in fourth quarter sales to $365 million.

Dialog on Thursday said it expected sales of $255-$285 million in the first quarter of 2017, up from the $241 million it made in the year-earlier quarter.

Hopes for strong chip deliveries to Apple’s iPhone and Samsung’s Galaxy have lifted the stock to a 17-month high, gaining 19 percent so far, this year and more than doubling from the 23.21 euro it hit in June.

Apple and Samsung are launching their new smartphones in the coming weeks. Expectations are high, especially for the 10 year edition of the iPhone, contains Dialog’s power management chip.

 

Sony releases the world’s fastest SD card

Sony has expanded its memory card line-up with the addition of the SF-G series cards – offering what it is claiming some rather impressive ultra-high-speed read and write times.

The SF-G series is supposed to be the world’s fastest SD card and is designed for high-performance DSLR or mirrorlesscameras, offering up to 299MB/sii write speeds, contributing to longer high-speed continuous burst mode shooting for high-resolution images with cameras supporting UHS-II.

Sony said the SF-G cards will allow more effective continuous burst mode shooting for high-resolution images so long as the camera in question supports UHS-II.

Write speeds will also be of considerable benefit to the wide range of high-end DSLR and mirrorless cameras that are capable of shooting 4K quality video. Faster write speeds also mean a shorter buffer clearing time, when shooting fast-moving action.

The series’ read speed is reaches up to 300MB/s, resulting in faster and smoother performance when transferring large files across to other devices for editing and sharing.

Available in 32GB, 64GB or 128GB from March 2017, all versions of the cards are compatible with Sony’s free file rescue software, for recovering lost content. No word on pricing yet.

Alongside the SF-G series, Sony has also introduced a new memory card reader, the MRW-S1, due for release in April. It features an in-built SuperSpeed USB port for cable-free PC connection, so that your files can be copied faster than by using the slower SD slot on a PC.

Brits arrest DT hacker

Britain’s National Crime Agency (NCA) has arrested someone for last year’s cyber-attack which infected nearly one million Deutsche Telekom routers.

The NCA fingered the collar of the 29 year old Brit at one of London’s airports, the coppers said in a statement.

The attack on Deutsche Telekom, Germany’s largest telecom company, took place in late November. Internet outages hit as many as 900,000 of its users, or about 4.5 percent of its fixed line customers.

German security experts thought the internet outages that have hit hundreds of thousands of Deutsche Telekom customers in Germany were part of a worldwide attempt to hijack routing devices.

Dirk Backofen, a senior Deutsche Telekom security executive said the attack was not an attack against Deutsche Telekom. “It was a global attack against all kinds of devices. How many other operators were affected, we don’t know,” he said.

Deutsche Telekom said the problems seemed to be connected to an attempt to make customers’ routers part of the Mirai botnet.

EE to build drones and balloons for better reception

UK telco EE has unveiled plans to deliver mobile and wireless broadband connectivity to internet blackspots via drones and helium balloons.

The company noted that its ‘air mast’ solution will be able to bolster 4G data services in rural locations, at major events, or in areas where natural disasters, such as flooding, have damaged traditional infrastructure.

EE CEO Marc Allera said that customers would be able to request a balloon with a mobile signal to hover over a certain area, providing them with an ‘on demand’ data service.

Dubbed ‘Helikites’ the sites will include a base station and antennae tethered to helium balloons. EE hopes to launch the first Helikite balloons later this year.

Drone technology is also under development to support the Helikite solution, it will not be introduced for the next year or two.

“I see innovations like this revolutionising the way people connect. We’re developing the concept of ‘coverage on demand”, said Allera.

The idea is that an event organiser could request a temporary EE capacity increase in a rural area, or a climber going up Ben Nevis could order an EE aerial coverage solution to follow them as they climb,

“We need to innovate, and we need to think differently, always using customers’ needs to drive the way we create new technologies,” he added.

The company also provided details on a fleet of rapid response vehicles (RRVs) which will be used to provide 4G connectivity to police, fire and ambulance services under a contract with the Emergency Services Network (ESN). At least to start with, Helikites are not expected to be used in the ESN programme.

EE is currently upgrading over 100 sites to 4G every week as part of its aim to reach 92 percent geographic coverage in the UK over the course of 2017. The company is also rolling out an additional 3,000 sites using low 800MHz spectrum to be able to reach further distances in rural areas and improve indoor coverage.

Intel soups up its Atoms

Intel has souped-up its Atom chip, which is more famous for being an underperforming low-end chip for mobile devices.

The latest Atom C3000 chips have up to 16 cores and are more sophisticated than ever. Of course these are not going into smartphones – Intel has given up on that market. Instead they are made for storage arrays, networking equipment, and internet of things devices.

To be fair,  networking and storage devices don’t require much grunt, so a low-power Atom chip will work. Few Intel server chips have more than 16 cores. In this case though, the number of Atom cores means the chip can handle more streams of data.

Under the bonnet of the C3000 is RAS (reliability, availability, and serviceability) capabilities, which is mostly found on high-end Xeon chips. The feature corrects data errors on the fly and prevents networking and storage equipment from crashing.

Intel is also providing development kits for writing storage and networking applications for the chips.

The new chips are already shipping to testers and will become available in the second half of this year.

The Atom C3000 succeeds the C2000 which were originally targeted at microservers and networking and storage equipment. The Atom C2000 is currently in the centre of a row over a flaw that could crash servers and networking equipment. Apparently the C2000 came with a flaw which caused it to die after two years. Intel has provided a temporary fix, but the company is working on a permanent fix.

The Atoms are not the only thing that Intel is making for networking gear. It also has the new Xeon D-1500 chips for networking and storage gear that require quicker turnover of processed data. The chips integrate 10-gigabit ethernet controllers and have a technology called QuickAssist to drive throughput of compressed data up to 40Gbps (bits per second).